Five techy tricks to practice your English over the summer

Picking up a book, writing a pen-friend or doing a language exchange in English are all tried and tested ways to keep improving and practicing your English over the summer months.  In fact I would suggest them all to my students and many of the activities below are based on them in one way or another. But with the devices and tech tools available to our learners I thought I would put a bit of a spin on the typical summer learning ideas.

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Fun exam prep ideas

You are teaching a test preparation course next semester. Students obviously need to take lots of practice tests in order to be successful. There’s no way around it. Practice makes perfect. But would you take a different approach in your teaching practice? How are these classes different from your regular classes? And how’s the atmosphere in the class? Do your students feel anxious about the exam?

Give your courses a spark by (re)using some fun activities that work in both exam preparation courses as well as in regular classes. I strongly believe that your students will really appreciate it.

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Once upon a time: 10 story activities for the primary classroom

Children love stories! Stories appeal to their vivid sense of imagination and appetite for fantasy. They help children understand and accept their own feelings and are a vehicle to teach values and about other cultures. And from a language perspective, they are a rich source of vocabulary and structures in context and lend themselves to both serious and enjoyable learning for our pupils.

In this blog post we will consider 10 classroom-ready activities to use alongside stories in the classroom. These are divided into three sections: before reading, while reading and post-reading

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Pearson Teacher Training Morning

 

Pearson will be in Bilbao and Madrid this week at the Pearson Teacher Training Morning: exploring the road to success. An event for teachers at Adult Learner Centres, on 11 May and 12 May.

We’re sure you will get plenty of practical and inspirational ideas from our talks. Check out the details below! 

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Happy World Book Day! 10 English book-related expressions

The 23rd of April sees the celebration of World Book Day, a festival organised by UNESCO to promote reading and publishing. The date was linked with books long before World Book Day came into existence (in 1995) however, with ‘La diada de Sant Jordi’, a special day for romance and literature in Catalonia. The 23rd April marks the death of both Cervantes and Shakespeare.

Apart from exchanging a rose and a book to celebrate, how about checking out these 10 book-related expressions in English, complete with examples?

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New Webinars: Success at Primary

If you are a primary English teacher looking for ideas there is still time to sign up for our free webinars which will take place next week.

In this latest series of professional development webinars for primary teachers of English we will address the following topics: how to support both the cognitive and linguistic development of pupils in bilingual programmes, fun and effective ways to get our younger students reading and how to use assessment for learning to help them become more successful and independent. Our speakers Susan House, Elizabeth Beer and Elena Merino will be ready with great ideas and insights to bring new life and energy to your classes.

Each webinar will be held twice, so that you can choose the time of the day that suits you best: 18.00 or 19:30 (CET).

Interested? Please visit our webinar page to find out more and register! 
If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at pearsonELT@pearson.com

Do you know any other teachers who would be interested in these webinars? Forward them this page so they can register as well.

Looking forward to seeing you online!

Top games for helping our Spanish-speaking students’ pronunciation (Part 1)

If you have taught English to Spanish speakers for a while, I’m sure you already have an idea of what the main pronunciation problems for them are. As a teacher of English and native speaker of Spanish, I have not only experienced those problems myself but also have always tried to help my students with effective and engaging techniques that I will be explaining in this post.

Below, you can find some of most problematic pronunciation areas for Spanish speakers (take a look at the Speakout Study Booster for Spanish speakers)  and how to get around them in class by using games.

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Equal opportunities in ELT: putting native-speakerism to bed

Recently, we shared an article about native / non-native speaker teachers (NST / NNST from now on) on the Pearson ELT Spain and Portugal facebook page and it sparked some quite lively debate. There were polarised arguments in the vein of ‘Natives don’t know their own grammar’ to ‘Non-natives can’t pronounce properly’ as well as more nuanced arguments in between and the aim of this blog post is to delve into this issue which remains a thorny one in our profession.

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Whose English is it anyway?

I am a native speaker of English.  I was born and raised speaking a particular variety of North American English.  It’s my mother tongue. Heck, my mother (and my father and the whole community around me for that matter) taught me how to speak it.  Well, to say they “taught” me isn’t entirely accurate. I was brought into the fold and participated in this living, growing, evolving thing that is my native language.  I’m proud of that. I feel like I belong to something quite beautiful and unique. It’s good to belong to something. It’s nice to share a language with other people, to know what they’re thinking and even, if you’re quite lucky, to have a little window into knowing how they feel.  I think that’s really very special.

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