Fun exam prep ideas

You are teaching a test preparation course next semester. Students obviously need to take lots of practice tests in order to be successful. There’s no way around it. Practice makes perfect. But would you take a different approach in your teaching practice? How are these classes different from your regular classes? And how’s the atmosphere in the class? Do your students feel anxious about the exam?

Give your courses a spark by (re)using some fun activities that work in both exam preparation courses as well as in regular classes. I strongly believe that your students will really appreciate it.

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Once upon a time: 10 story activities for the primary classroom

Children love stories! Stories appeal to their vivid sense of imagination and appetite for fantasy. They help children understand and accept their own feelings and are a vehicle to teach values and about other cultures. And from a language perspective, they are a rich source of vocabulary and structures in context and lend themselves to both serious and enjoyable learning for our pupils.

In this blog post we will consider 10 classroom-ready activities to use alongside stories in the classroom. These are divided into three sections: before reading, while reading and post-reading

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Pearson Teacher Training Morning

 

Pearson will be in Bilbao and Madrid this week at the Pearson Teacher Training Morning: exploring the road to success. An event for teachers at Adult Learner Centres, on 11 May and 12 May.

We’re sure you will get plenty of practical and inspirational ideas from our talks. Check out the details below! 

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Happy World Book Day! 10 English book-related expressions

The 23rd of April sees the celebration of World Book Day, a festival organised by UNESCO to promote reading and publishing. The date was linked with books long before World Book Day came into existence (in 1995) however, with ‘La diada de Sant Jordi’, a special day for romance and literature in Catalonia. The 23rd April marks the death of both Cervantes and Shakespeare.

Apart from exchanging a rose and a book to celebrate, how about checking out these 10 book-related expressions in English, complete with examples?

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New Webinars: Success at Primary

If you are a primary English teacher looking for ideas there is still time to sign up for our free webinars which will take place next week.

In this latest series of professional development webinars for primary teachers of English we will address the following topics: how to support both the cognitive and linguistic development of pupils in bilingual programmes, fun and effective ways to get our younger students reading and how to use assessment for learning to help them become more successful and independent. Our speakers Susan House, Elizabeth Beer and Elena Merino will be ready with great ideas and insights to bring new life and energy to your classes.

Each webinar will be held twice, so that you can choose the time of the day that suits you best: 18.00 or 19:30 (CET).

Interested? Please visit our webinar page to find out more and register! 
If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at pearsonELT@pearson.com

Do you know any other teachers who would be interested in these webinars? Forward them this page so they can register as well.

Looking forward to seeing you online!

Equal opportunities in ELT: putting native-speakerism to bed

Recently, we shared an article about native / non-native speaker teachers (NST / NNST from now on) on the Pearson ELT Spain and Portugal facebook page and it sparked some quite lively debate. There were polarised arguments in the vein of ‘Natives don’t know their own grammar’ to ‘Non-natives can’t pronounce properly’ as well as more nuanced arguments in between and the aim of this blog post is to delve into this issue which remains a thorny one in our profession.

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Effective ways to work with euphemisms in the classroom

Have you been offered a career change? An early retirement opportunity? Well, I’m sorry but I think you have been fired. But saying the first two sounds harsh or too straightforward, doesn’t it?

A euphemism, also called doublespeak, “makes the bad seem good, the negative seem positive, the unnatural seem natural, the unpleasant seem attractive, or at least tolerable”. So how are our L2 students going to understand such nuanced language? Continue reading

5 fantastically fun ideas for the primary classroom

With the Pearson Teacher Training Department for Spain and Portugal having delivered a large number of sessions around primary learners so far this year (and with many more to come!), the aim of this week’s post is to share five of the practical ideas we’ve been looking at. These activities have fun and engagement at their heart, as well as including the language practice our students need to make progress.

1) Sing a welcome song

Songs are a great way to learn English and thankfully for us, most primary-aged pupils are only too happy to sing. We often use songs as a way to contextualise a grammar point or some vocabulary – a catchy song will help this stick. But what about beginning our lessons with a welcome song? This is a great way to set a positive climate for learning and to calm and focus our students. Here is an example of a welcome song:

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Scaffolding: Giving our primary pupils the support they need

The following is an outline of the ideas and activities covered in my webinar on scaffolding at primary for Pearson Spain and Portugal on 20 February 2018.

Teaching primary learners can be rewarding and sometimes challenging. The enthusiasm and energy can be extremely satisfying and help keep us engaged as educators. To be successful, we often hear about providing support to help our students achieve success. Support can cover a variety of different aspects of our learners’ social and emotional development, their cognitive learning and their language needs. Unlike adults, who have experience we can draw on to create connections and foster learning, when we work with our primary and secondary students, we are often responsible for introducing students to new information for the first time. When this happens, the support that works best for success is referred to as scaffolding. Scaffolding helps us present new ideas and concepts while making sure learners have the tools they need to be successful.

That said, what is scaffolding and what does it really mean? When you think about how you first learned to do something you can get a sense of what scaffolding is all about.

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