Pearson Teacher Training Morning

 

Pearson will be in Bilbao and Madrid this week at the Pearson Teacher Training Morning: exploring the road to success. An event for teachers at Adult Learner Centres, on 11 May and 12 May.

We’re sure you will get plenty of practical and inspirational ideas from our talks. Check out the details below! 

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New Webinars: Success at Primary

If you are a primary English teacher looking for ideas there is still time to sign up for our free webinars which will take place next week.

In this latest series of professional development webinars for primary teachers of English we will address the following topics: how to support both the cognitive and linguistic development of pupils in bilingual programmes, fun and effective ways to get our younger students reading and how to use assessment for learning to help them become more successful and independent. Our speakers Susan House, Elizabeth Beer and Elena Merino will be ready with great ideas and insights to bring new life and energy to your classes.

Each webinar will be held twice, so that you can choose the time of the day that suits you best: 18.00 or 19:30 (CET).

Interested? Please visit our webinar page to find out more and register! 
If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at pearsonELT@pearson.com

Do you know any other teachers who would be interested in these webinars? Forward them this page so they can register as well.

Looking forward to seeing you online!

Top games for helping our Spanish-speaking students’ pronunciation (Part 1)

If you have taught English to Spanish speakers for a while, I’m sure you already have an idea of what the main pronunciation problems for them are. As a teacher of English and native speaker of Spanish, I have not only experienced those problems myself but also have always tried to help my students with effective and engaging techniques that I will be explaining in this post.

Below, you can find some of most problematic pronunciation areas for Spanish speakers (take a look at the Speakout Study Booster for Spanish speakers)  and how to get around them in class by using games.

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Whose English is it anyway?

I am a native speaker of English.  I was born and raised speaking a particular variety of North American English.  It’s my mother tongue. Heck, my mother (and my father and the whole community around me for that matter) taught me how to speak it.  Well, to say they “taught” me isn’t entirely accurate. I was brought into the fold and participated in this living, growing, evolving thing that is my native language.  I’m proud of that. I feel like I belong to something quite beautiful and unique. It’s good to belong to something. It’s nice to share a language with other people, to know what they’re thinking and even, if you’re quite lucky, to have a little window into knowing how they feel.  I think that’s really very special.

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Effective ways to work with euphemisms in the classroom

Have you been offered a career change? An early retirement opportunity? Well, I’m sorry but I think you have been fired. But saying the first two sounds harsh or too straightforward, doesn’t it?

A euphemism, also called doublespeak, “makes the bad seem good, the negative seem positive, the unnatural seem natural, the unpleasant seem attractive, or at least tolerable”. So how are our L2 students going to understand such nuanced language? Continue reading

The art of questioning. Helping our teenage students to become critical thinkers

In today’s world, where news spreads like wildfire, it is not uncommon to find our teenage students taking things for granted and believing whatever is “on the internet”. As teachers, we want our students to become critical thinkers so that they can make sense of this VUCA world. Helping our students to develop strategies for asking (good) questions will not only prepare them for their future but also help them develop critical minds that will maximize their learning experience across disciplines.

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5 Things to love about teaching English

Tomorrow is Valentine’s Day, and to celebrate it we are re-posting this article from our archives on reasons why we love teaching English.

And while we’re on the topic of love and English, check out this post with a list of romantic readers for your students!

No two people have quite the same experience of teaching English.  My own history includes mostly private sector teaching to adults and teens (so this post might not reflect your situation exactly).  But regardless of the context you teach in, many of us, and this is undoubtedly true of any profession, might get to a time when we question why it is that we are doing it, or maybe we forget why we got into it in the first place.

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Pearson offers a new webinar series for primary English teachers

Are you a primary English teacher interested in the latest methodological trends that will make your teaching more effective and get your students engaged in learning like never before?  Are you looking for new ideas to bring that extra spark of joy and wonder to your classes?  And are you the type of educator who is not only thinking about getting them to speak English, but also getting them prepared to be active participants in their communities both now and in the future?

Then join us for “Empowering primary learners for the future”, our free webinar series which will focus on the concerns of the primary teacher and learner in the 21st Century.

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How to gamify your primary classroom: practical ideas

How often do you play games in your classroom? What for? Do you keep track of your students’ results after a game? Most teachers in primary (but not only!) rely on games because we know that kids learn through play (and it is fun, isn’t it?).

What games do you play in the ELT classroom? Do you assign points / badges / rewards? Do your pupils have an avatar? Keep on reading if you want to know how gamification can bring your lessons to life.

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